Hedgerow Henporium’s brilliant warm mash recipe!

Last year we shared this amazing warming winter mash recipe from our friends at Hedgerow Henporium. Our followers loved it and now that winter is coming around again we thought it was the perfect time to share it so you can keep your hens happy and healthy this winter!

Chicken feed bucket

Warm mash keeps chickens healthy!

This recipe is not only delicious for hens but healthy and nutritious too. They’ll love pecking at the veg and they’ll get all the added vitamins they need from the “hidden” ingredients including calcium and cod liver oil.

You’ll need a large shallow dish to mix and serve the mash in.

Ingredients and method:

Use layers pellets (or your normal chicken feed) as the base which should make up about half the quantity of the other ingredients below.

Add any combination of the following veg – a few handfuls or enough for the veg to be visible will be enough:

  • Frozen sweetcorn
  • Frozen cabbage
  • Frozen peas
  • Frozen spinach

To the vegetable and chicken feed mix add:

  • A tablespoon of cod liver oil
  • A tablespoon of poultry spice
  • A splash of poultry multivitamins
  • A teaspoon of cider vinegar
  • A tablespoon of garlic flakes
  • A tablespoon of ground up egg shells (for calcium) or a teaspoon of liquid calcium (optional)
  • A handful of raw flax seed/pumpkin seed
  • A handful of porridge oats (optional)
  • A single drop of oregano or thyme essential oil (very overpowering if used to excess) optional

Mix with enough water (preferably warm water) so that the mixture has a porridge like consistency. It shouldn’t be too runny and the mixture will probably get slightly thicker if you leave it to stand.

You can add more poultry spice to improve the smell – although chickens don’t seem to mind!

Once the mash is ready, just stand back and watch them eat with gusto!

Alternative combinations:

  1. Soak haricot, or other dried beans, overnight and cook for an hour. Stir this into the basic mix. You could also add cooked lentils.
  2. Boil vegetable peelings, including potato, and add the peelings with the cooking water to the basic mix. (Be sure not to use onion or garlic peelings.)

If you liked this recipe you can find more, plus great advice and poultry related discussions, at the brilliant blog – Hedgerow Henporium Chicken Chat.

Image source: South West Pine

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Feeding your flock – daily feed for your hens

Last week we gave you our top tips and tricks for chicken first aid. This week we’re looking at feed to keep your flock happy and healthy. Plus – we’ve got a great giveaway for our customers!

Smallholder Natural Free Range feed

Smallholder Natural Free Range feed

If you’ve ever been near a chicken you’ll know that there’s a big difference between what they will eat and what they should eat! As chickens are omnivores they’ll eat pretty much anything which is why they can be such an economical pet to feed.

However, it’s important that you feed them a properly formulated chicken feed that is suitable for their age and egg production, if they are of laying age. In years gone by chickens would have been fed grain mixes or dried mash as well as the kitchen scraps.

In modern times we have more advanced knowledge of the nutrition chickens need to stay healthy and lay plenty of eggs. Here’s a closer look at feed options for modern chicken keepers:

Layers feed (pellets or mash)

All chickens, regardless of age or breed, need protein to produce healthy feathers and eggs. All commercially sold chicken feeds contain protein in different percentages depending on which age of chicken the feed is designed for.

For example, “growers’ pellets” will have a higher percentage of protein to enable young birds to grow, produce healthy feathers, and begin laying. “Layers’ pellets”, which is designed for older birds, will contain around 16% protein as well as the correct balance of minerals and nutrients, such as calcium, to ensure good egg shell production.

As well as pellets you can also by formulated chicken feed in mash form and all feed should be fed “ad-lib” so hens can help themselves. You shouldn’t need to put feed inside the chicken house but it does need to be kept dry and out of the rain.

Mixed corn

Many chicken keepers also feed their flock a small amount of mixed corn as it encourages hens to move more as they scratch around to find it. Corn is useful to feed in the winter as it helps keep hens warn and ensures their crop is full overnight.

However, be warned, too much corn will result in fat hens that don’t lay!

Greens

Chickens need plenty of greens in their diet to stay healthy. This could be weeds, offcuts of green vegetables, and leftover cooked greens. Although, be careful to avoid lettuce as it has a high water content and very little nutritional value.

Cabbage, kale, and cauliflower are often much appreciated treats for hens.

Competition time!

We love hearing from our happy customers and to help keep those feed bills down we’re offering the first three people to send us testimonials about our chicken houses a £5 voucher!

You can redeem the voucher against any purchase of the Smallholder Range of Natural Free Range Layers Pellets.

Please email your testimonials to alice@jimvysearks.co.uk and we’d love to see a picture of your house in action.

Hedgerow Henporium’s brilliant warm mash recipe!

When our friends at Hedgerow Henporium heard we were discussing warming winter treats this week they were only too happy to give us a recipe for a delicious warm mash!

Chicken feed bucket

Warm mash keeps chickens healthy!

This recipe is not only delicious for hens but healthy and nutritious too. They’ll love pecking at the veg and they’ll get all the added vitamins they need from the “hidden” ingredients including calcium and cod liver oil.

You’ll need a large shallow dish to mix and serve the mash in.

Ingredients and method:

Use layers pellets (or your normal chicken feed) as the base which should make up about half the quantity of the other ingredients below.

Add any combination of the following veg – a few handfuls or enough for the veg to be visible will be enough:

  • Frozen sweetcorn
  • Frozen cabbage
  • Frozen peas
  • Frozen spinach

To the vegetable and chicken feed mix add:

  • A tablespoon of cod liver oil
  • A tablespoon of poultry spice
  • A splash of poultry multivitamins
  • A teaspoon of cider vinegar
  • A tablespoon of garlic flakes
  • A tablespoon of ground up egg shells (for calcium) or a teaspoon of liquid calcium (optional)
  • A handful of raw flax seed/pumpkin seed
  • A handful of porridge oats (optional)
  • A single drop of oregano or thyme essential oil (very overpowering if used to excess) optional

Mix with enough water (preferably warm water) so that the mixture has a porridge like consistency. It shouldn’t be too runny and the mixture will probably get slightly thicker if you leave it to stand.

You can add more poultry spice to improve the smell – although chickens don’t seem to mind!

Once the mash is ready, just stand back and watch them eat with gusto!

Alternative combinations:

  1. Soak haricot, or other dried beans, overnight and cook for an hour. Stir this into the basic mix. You could also add cooked lentils.
  2. Boil vegetable peelings, including potato, and add the peelings with the cooking water to the basic mix. (Be sure not to use onion or garlic peelings.)

If you liked this recipe you can find more, plus great advice and poultry related discussions, at the brilliant blog – Hedgerow Henporium Chicken Chat.

Image source: South West Pine